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*African Studies Research Guide: Background Information

Covers major background sources, databases and web sites related to African Studies

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Getting personalized research assistance is easy! Librarians are available to help you in-person or via telephone, e-mail, and IM.

Face-to-face help is available at the Woodruff Service Desk on level 2. For our service hours, please see our current service desk hours.

Appointments with a subject specialist can be made by current Emory students, faculty and staff. To set up a consultation appointment with a subject librarian, see our Subject Librarian Directory and e-mail the appropriate librarian.

The subject specialist for African Studies is Jessica Reuther.

Contact Info:
Phone: 404-727-7897
Email: jessica.reuther@emory.edu
Location: Room 226, Woodruff Library (ask for me at the Reference desk on Level 2)
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Check out all of Emory's African Studies Guides

Featured Items

New to African Studies?  Here are some great places to start.

Studying Africa: a Guide to Resources 2014. The Nordic Africa Institute compiled this up-to-date guide. Each of the editions covers the subsequent scholarship and resources since the prior edition.  The 2005 edition covered older literature, the 2011 edition covered resources produced or updated between 2004 and 2010, and the third updates it to 2014. 

Remember Africa is NOT a Country

Africa is a vast and diverse continent. 

 

The African continent defies stereotypes.  Various groups have adopted the statement, "Africa is not a country." All of these groups challenge the generalizations and misinformation that overshadow the cultural, artistic, and intellectual dynamism of those living in the diverse regions of the continent of Africa.

 

Additional Information on Africa's Diversity: 

Africa is Not a Country, a Gapminder interactive presentation showing graphically how the countries of Africa are very different.
 

CNN iReport featured in February 2014 the photography exhibit that the African Students Association of Ithaca College organized entitled "Africa is not a country.  

 

The Guardian, a United Kingdom based newspaper, featured two articles in January 2014 discussing how the media and politicians reinforced the idea that Africa was a country.  "Africa is not a country" and "If Western journalists get Africa wrong, who gets it right?" 

"Africa is a Country" Blog: There is also a blog that uses the title "Africa is a Country" ironically.  It is a collective of scholars, writers, artists, filmmakers, bloggers, and curators who publish op ed pieces and reviews about current events and the artistic outputs of the continent.  Emory alums Kara Moskowitz (African History) and Fernando Esquivel-Suarez (Spanish) contributed the post "Security Killings: American Police Violence, from Ferguson to Nairobi."

Start Your Research

Below is an annotated bibliography directing researchers to some general works useful in the initial stages of designing a research project or fact checking material. 

The reference collection of the Woodruff Library has a large collection of resources for background information on Africa it is ustful to browse this collection especially in the call numbers Ref DT and Ref Z3500.The Reference section is on level 2 of the library beyond the circulation desk near the spiral stairwell on the opposite side of the elevators.  

To find information on individual African countries, maps, music, language, and literature hover over the Specialized Resources tab at the top of this page.   

 Reference Guides and Bibliographies

NOTE: Editions after 2006 are available online.  For the most up to date information go to the online version of the African Studies Companion

Studying Africa: a Guide to Resources. 3rd ed. Nordic Africa Institute. 2014. Nicely up-to-date on digital resources for the study of Africa. Each of the editions covers the subsequent scholarship and resources since the prior edition.  The 2005 edition covered older literature, the 2011 edition covered resources produced or updated between 2004 and 2010, and the third updates it to 2014. 

 

 

Encyclopedias, Dictionaries, Biographies, and General Histories

NOTE: The New Encyclopedia of Africa is also available electronically as part of the Gale Virtual Reference Library. 

 

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