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Digital Art History: Emory Projects

Inspired by the report, Transitioning to a Digital World: Art History, Its Research Centers, and Digital Scholarship, by Diane M. Zorich for the Kress Foundation and CHMN

Tracking Samothrace


Views of Rome

Emblem Books

ETDs

Tracking Samothrace

Tracking Samothrace is a DiSC funded project to develop best practices for digitally recording the discoveries of archaeological excavation, through work at the Sanctuary of the Great Gods on Samothrace. While the value of a digital database for archaeological records is generally recognized, this project develops a semantically enriched database designed to fulfill three powerful functions:

  1. preserve the factual archaeological record surrounding each object
  2. serve as an effective and flexible tool for imbedding the study, reconstruction, and interpretation of these objects within the records
  3. produce the final products of study, including print and on-line resources.

We aim to produce a white paper documenting best practices for ‘objective’ and ‘interpretive’ data entry, workflow, and methodology.

Faculty: Bonna Wescoat                                                                                             
Graduate Research Assistant : Alison Hight
Visual Resources Librarian: Frank Jackson
DiSC Project Manager: Stewart Varner
Library team members: Kim Collins, Kim Durante, Michael Page

Views of Rome

The Views of Rome DiSC project uses Emory’s copy of Pirro Ligorio’s 1561 map of ancient Rome to create an interactive digital tool for use by students in the classroom and by the general public. Ligorio’s map presents a bird’s-eye view of ancient Rome ca. AD 100-300. The map preserves a Renaissance vision of Roman antiquity. Our aim is for the project to address the scholarly question of how the Renaissance viewed and actively engaged with the ancient remains of Rome. The “Views of Rome” project will present a high-resolution scan of Ligorio’s map that users can explore in their browser. In addition to making this rare work public in this manner, users will also be able to click on different structures on the map to learn more about them. We will create this content in conjunction with undergraduate and graduate seminars, in which students will contribute primary research on Ligorio’s sources for different sectors of the map. (http://disc.library.emory.edu/viewsofrome/)

Faculty: Eric Varner and Sarah McPhee
DiSC Project Manager: Brian Croxall
Librarian Team Members: David Faulds and Kim Collins

Emblem Books

Between MARBL and Pitts, Emory owns over 50 emblem books published mainly in Northern Europe and dating from the mid-sixteenth to the early eighteenth centuries.  The project at hand aims to begin digitizing our excellent holdings of emblemata, firstly to provide our faculty and graduate students with a valuable scholarly resource for the purposes of research and teaching, and secondly to link the database we assemble, with Emblematica Online.

By definition, emblem books adduce their arguments by means of a complex text-image apparatus that operates bi-directionally, reading from text to image, and conversely, from image to text.  Generally, an epigrammatic motto is attached to a pictorial image, and a longer text in verse or prose comments upon this relationship.  The connections between text and image are often complex, occasionally paradoxical, for they were devised to test the reader-viewer’s powers of observation and interpretation.  Emblem books had many functions: some were proverbial, others scholarly, yet others exegetical.  Some were used to meditate on sacred or secular subjects, others to cultivate the soul and facilitate exercises geared toward self-formation.

Participants in Professor Melion’s seminar will study the various genres of emblem book housed at MARBL and Pitts—scriptural, ethical, amorous, among others--and

will create an OMEKA site consisting of 8-10 emblem books accompanied by scholarly articles discussing the form and function of the books in question and examine the textual and visual modes of argumentation that they variously exemplify. 

Name of Faculty Sponsor: Walter Melion

 

ETDs

The Emory Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) Repository is a joint initiative launched by the Emory University Libraries, the Laney Graduate School, and Emory College.


Click to view Emory art history honors theses  and masters and dissertations

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