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Productivity Tools for Graduate Students: Home

About This Guide

We were inspired to create our guide to Productivity Tools for Graduate Students by the work of Crystal Renfro, a subject librarian for Mathematics and Industrial & Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. You can view her subject guide or take a look at Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians, a blog she co-authors, for more inspiration.

Managing Your Digital Research Assets

Keeping up with your research can be challenging, especially if you've got an extensive amount of work saved. Be sure to take a look at Managing Your Digital Research Assets, a guide compiled by Data Management Specialist Jennifer Doty. The guide is supplementary to a Digital Scholarship Commons (DiSC) workshop called "Managing Your Digital Assets."

Productivity Tools

When you have a lot to accomplish in a little time, you'll find yourself wanting to improve your productivity. We've compiled a guide of tools and methods you may use to complete your studies and manage the rest of your life at the same time.

Why are there so many methods and tools? Simply put, not everyone accomplishes tasks the same way. What works for you might not achieve the same results for your classmate. If you try something from one of these pages and it doesn't do what you need it to, don't be discouraged. You might find a new technique we haven't mentioned. If that happens, be sure to let us know so we can list it here!

Time Management Ninja offers some tips for how to choose tools that suit your needs.

More Resources

If you're looking for other places to gather methods and tools, consider Learnist, a social-networking board that appears similar to Pinterest, but which is intended to be used more for academic pursuits. You can read message boards on a variety of topics without an account, but if you want to join, you'll need a Facebook account and to grant Learnist permission to access that account. If you join Learnist, you'll be able to follow specific message boards or members, and post and comment on others' boards.

Also, for alternatives to the applications you use every day, consider AlternativeTo, a website on which people can suggest and vote for their preferred alternatives to commonly used software.

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