Skip to main content

REL 190: Books and Articles

Finding Books and Articles with DiscoverE

  • DiscoverE :The Library's primary search engine for books and articles available through Emory -- and not through Google.
    • Try this search on the Catalog tab (searches Emory's catalog only): Buddhist women
      • For Zotero users: Click a record then click the "Save to Zotero" icon in the browser address bar.
      • Stable URL: It is often useful for your own use to add to your bibliography the URL to a full text item or at least to its bibliographic record, if it is available. Click on Actions, then Permalink, to access a stable URL for each record.
    • Compare this search in the DiscoverE Combined tab : Buddhist women.
      • For Zotero users:  Click the Zotero plugin "Save to Zotero" icon in the URL address bar. 
      • Stable URL: Click on Actions, then Permalink, to access a stable URL for each record.
      • Remote access: Click Login and enter your Emory netID and password to enable searches of databases.
    • Back story: DiscoverE is a "federated" or "metasearch" engine and, under the Catalog tab, can search everything in the catalog, eJournals (journal titles only), and Emory digitized materials; Under the Combined tab, it will search all of the above, as well as Electronic Theses & Dissertations, the Hathi Trust Digital Library, Emory Repositories, and Primo Central (an index of hundreds of millions of scholarly e-resources). 
      • In this sense, DiscoverE is like Google, providing a single search interface for multiple diverse sources.
      • Advantages over Google:
        • DiscoverE gives you access to items in the "deep web" that Google can't see because they are proprietary which means the copyright owners usually do not let Google index them.  JSTOR is one exception.
        • Content is quality-controlled for scholarly value
        • Results can be more manageable in scale. 
      • On the other hand...
        • DiscoverE does not have the sophisticated algorithms of Google to rank by popularity or relevance.
        • DiscoverE will not perform as well as the dedicated interface of a database which might provide, e.g., unique subject headings or citation searching. 
          • Sometimes a native database interface, e.g., BAS, is so unique that DiscoverE will not be successful in displaying even basic results from them. 
          • So sometimes you have to dive even deeper by going directly to an individual database to do your search.
        • Login required for remote access to articles: Because the DiscoverE Combined tab searches databases with access restricted to Emory, you need to login with your netid when accessing it from off-campus or non-campus computers.

Finding Books and Articles with Databases

  • Selected Article Databases (see list of recommended databases by subject in Databases @ Emory; Try searching for relevant databases under a subject such as "Religion" or "South Asian Studies."
  • The following collections of journal articles are recommended for this class.
    • You can search these through DiscoverE, but it is better to search these databases in their native interface rather than through DiscoverE. The native interface gives you more options, and it also generates more relevant results.
    • Remote access: Note that, because access is paid for by Emory Libraries, when you link to a database, you'll be asked to login with your NetID if you are using a non-Emory computer.  If you have trouble, try using the link to the database in Databases @ Emory.  Otherwise, contact the Library Service Desk.
  • JSTOR:
    • Try this search for "buddhism AND women" in JSTOR. You can now find books in JSTOR, as well as articles.
    • Tips:
      • Check out JSTOR's list of journals in Religion for a nice vetted list of major scholarly journals in the field. 
        • You can check the ejournals@Emory page to see if Emory has access to more coverage of a journal online than JSTOR offers.
        • Enter the keyword stem "buddh" to find titles with variations on the term Buddhism in them. 
        • The results page also gives you the option to search DiscoverE to see if we have a print subscription.
      • The Advanced Search interface lets you narrow your search by disciplinary categories.
        • Unlike other databases, JSTOR allows itself to be indexed and searched by Google, although you still have to go through Emory ID authentication to get to the texts themselves.
        • Compare the same search of JSTOR in Google.
    • Export Citations:
      • Once you click on an article's title page, click on "Cite This Item." 
      • From here, you can copy the citation in MLA, APA, or Chicago style.
      • Alternatively, you can export the citation to Zotero or other citation management program. 
      • In Zotero...
        • Select the item after importing it
        • Right click, select "Create bibliography..."
        • Select a format like MLA or Chicago
        • Select "copy" if you want to paste it into another interface like Google Docs.
    • Stable URL: Every JSTOR record has a stable URL assigned.  It may appear below the title and publisher information, or it may appear when you click "Cite This Item." 
    • Back story: JSTOR is a non-profit organization funded by individual and library subscriptions. 
      • It stores full text from scholarly journals as well as some archival collections. 
      • Its agreement with publishers often requires them to "embargo" the most recent issues -- sometimes these "moving walls" go back as far as five years -- so that the publishers can collect as much subscription revenue as possible.  Libraries often have to subscribe directly with a journal's publishers or with "aggregators" like EBSCO to access more recent materials.
  • Bibliography of Asian Studies (BAS)
    • Try this search on keyword phrase "Buddh* AND wom*n".
      • Note use of boolean operator and wildcard character and selection of the keyword phrase "Philosophy & Religion -- Buddhism " from the databases's controlled index as displayed in the facets on the left.
      • Compare results of a similar search ("buddhism AND women") in DiscoverE (Combined Search).  Select "Articles" on the left under "Refine My Results." Then select "Peer-Reviewed Journals."
    • Citations from BAS:
      • Click on the item, then click Cite. From here, you can copy and paste the citation in the appropriate format, or you can export the citation in RIS format.
    • Stable URL: You can find a permalink for each article by clicking on it and selecting "permalink" at the right.
    • Tips
      • To see if Emory has access to the full-text of an article cited, click on the "Find It @ Your Library" link then in the new window, click "Find It @ Emory."  Or you can search for the journal title (not the article title) in ejournals@Emory to see if we have access to it online. 
      • In either case, the results window will also give you the option to search the catalog for the journal title to see if we have a print copy. 
      • If Emory doesn't have a subscription electronic or print, you can request an electronic copy of an article from Inter-Library Loan.  Often an electronic copy of the article will be emailed to you within days. Enter the citation information into the Inter-Library Loan request form. 
    • Back story: BAS indexes journals and book chapters in Asian Studies published in western languages from 1971 to the present and provides citations only, not full-text.
      • Sponsored by the Association of Asian Studies, a scholarly non-profit professional organization, and funded by subscription.
      • It is not part of a commercial aggregator interface like EBSCOhost. 
  • ATLA Religion Database with ATLA Serials
    • Try this search on budd* AND wom?n
    • Citation:
      • Click the item in search results to open item record then click "Cite" or "Export" from right side panel.
      • Click "Cite" to copy/paste the citation in one of the available formats.
      • Click "Export" to import into Endnote or Zotero.
    • Stable URL: For each record a "permalink" is generated which can find on the right side panel.
    • Back story:
      • ATLA indexes journals in Religious Studies. ATLA Religion is produced by a non-profit professional association, the American Theological Libraries Association.
      • Like BAS, it provides citations only, but will provide links to full-text when available from other databases in EBSCO's service. 
        • Look also for a Find It at Emory button which will search DiscoverE for the journal title.  If Emory doesn't have it, you can enter the citation information into the Inter-Library Loan request form.
        • The EBSCO interface also lets you select other databases within its service to search at the same time. Click "Choose Databases" at the top and try selecting, for example, Religion and Philosophy Collection, MLA International Bibliography, World History Collection, and/or Women's Studies International.
  • More journal articles and beyond: Databases @ Emory.
    • For other article databases, take a look, for example, at the resources recommended under the Subject headings "Religion" and "Women's & Gender Studies." 
    • Try ArtStor for fine art images tagged with Buddhism and women.
    • Try WorldCat to search thousands of library catalogs across the U.S. and other major world libraries.  If you find a title here that's not at Emory, you can request it from ILL.  Note that this interface via Emory Libraries offers more features than the public WorldCat interface.

Finding Resources with Google

Google

  • Google Scholar 
    • Try this search on Buddhist women.
    • Tips
      • Do you see a Find It @ Emory button in search results?  If not, follow the instructions on their Scholar Preferences page. Click on "Library Links" on the left side of the page. Search for Emory. Select "Find it @ Emory."
      • Can you use boolean operators or wildcard or truncation characters?  If not, why not? Check out their advanced search options here.
    • Back story: Searches scholarly articles only from public domain sources or those publishers' databases that "expose" their information to Google's bots to index. 
      • Access to the full text may be restricted when you click through unless Emory has licensed access. 
  • Google Books
    • Try this search on Buddhist Women
    • Tip: To see full text books from the first period of western exploration of Buddhism, click on Search Tools then Time then "19th century."
    • Back story: Google Books are books and magazines digitized in full by Google in coordination with major research libraries. 
      • Only those in public domain can be viewed in full.  Those tend to be older works published before 1923.
      • The OCR (optical character recognition) process for identifying words in the digitized image is not 100% accurate so searches based on their indexes sometimes yield strange results.

 

© Emory University Libraries - 540 Asbury Circle, Atlanta, Georgia 30322